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Gender Diversity: Advancing Women in Leadership

Gender Diversity: Advancing Women in Leadership Gender diversity in the workplace is becoming a major factor in many ways; not only does it help new employees determine whether or not they want to work for the organization in question, but there are several other positive effects that organizations can take advantage of if they make gender diversity in the workplace a priority. Gender Diversity in the Workplace: there are 3 Ways to Be Inclusive, join us to learn more…. Thinking outside of the box, gender diversity in the workplace can be addressed by unique and interesting tools, like Workplace by Facebook’s bots, chat, and live video features. Having trouble with gender diversity in your workplace? Not sure how Workplace by Facebook can help solve this common problem? Read along to see how and why your organization should put an emphasis on gender diversity in your workplace today, and how Workplace by Facebook’s unique features are able to help you take the first steps towards a more diverse workforce. Or, join us to learn more! Let’s Talk About Gender Diversity in the Workplace – What Is It? Why is it Necessary? Simply put, gender diversity is the equitable or fair representation of people of different genders within your organization. But gender diversity in the workplace isn’t just about having the right mix of males and females in your organization. You need to look at the bigger picture. Below, let’s look at some key questions to ask yourself: Does your organization provide a safe environment for women, transgender, or non-binary individuals that you hire? Do you have a strong anti-bullying and anti-harassment policy in place? Is there any unconscious bias in the way that your organizational processes and systems are set up? Is the balance of power in your organization equal – is there sufficient gender diversity on your executive team, on your board(s), and in management roles? Simply hiring women, transgender, or non-binary people into your workplace isn’t enough. To reap the many benefits of gender diversity, you need to empower those workers to not only reach but exceed their full potential! diversityconference@23 No Comments October 14, 2023

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Workshops: Modern Diversity Training Courses with Best Leaders

Workshops: Modern Diversity Training Courses with Best Leaders Inclusion and diversity training is one tactical component of a D & I strategy. Training provides the knowledge, skills and tools in gaining critical knowledge and skills. This is important for creating and sustaining change that fosters a more creative, inclusive, respectful and productive workforce and workplace. Inclusion and diversity training must be flexible to meet the demands and schedules of today’s active working environments. Centre for Intellectual Excellence offers various training products that are flexible in their delivery and duration. So, no matter where your organization and skill gaps are…our training solutions will not only help you close those gaps but will also transform your workplace. It is important that diverstiy and inclusion are practiced in every aspect of our life — starting with the workplace. Whether your workers are part of the LGBTQ community, belong to minority groups due to their gender or ethnicity, or are significantly older or younger than the majority in the office, it is just as important for them to be included and accepted in the day-to-day workplace for their personal successes and those of the organization. But why exactly is a strong D&I program something to embrace and emphasize? Employee Engagement: If you want workers to be excited about and actively involved in where they work, a strong diversity and inclusion program can instill a passion that’s contagious and shared throughout the company. Within ADP, business resource groups (BRGs) allow the company to tap into the energy of passionate and engaged employees marrying technology with interoffice communication. BRGs inform employers and employees with newsletters, videos and upcoming meetings and events. Tools like this can enhance employee engagement, which also contributes to enhancing discretionary efforts company-wide. Company Confidence: The importance of having a culture that embraces diversity and inclusion plays a huge role in the overarching confidence of the company. This allows for a larger platform for innovation, creativity and a variety of perspectives that will leave your employees feeling like they are in a safe place to be themselves and produce their best work. Having this momentum present in the office also improves employees’ wellbeing and enhances how they feel toward the company overall. Attracting Talent: Diversity and inclusion programs build up their people from the inside out, and foster an environment that is more attractive for prospective employees. A higher caliber of industry professionals will want to join a company that strives to provide a comfortable, supportive, and inspiring atmosphere where people of different ethnicities, genders and sexual orientations can flourish. Choosing Respectful Behaviors for all Employees Choosing Respect in the Workplace™ Inclusion & Diversity Training for Executives Executive Briefing Inclusion & Diversity Training for Supervisors & Managers Building Inclusive Teams™ Leveraging Diversity and Inclusion for Engagement & Innovation™ Charting Your Course Diversity & Inclusion Knowledge Map™ Inclusion & Diversity Training for Customer Service Providing Outstanding Service Across Cultures™ Inclusion & Diversity Training for HealthCare Creating Inclusive and Culturally Competent Teams HealthCare IMPACT Roadmap™ Inclusion, Cultural Competency and You™ (training-in-a-box tool kit) HealthCare Xpress™ (training-in-a-box tool kit) PRISM’s Unconscious Bias Training The Elephant We Can’t See™ Workshop Diversity, Inclusion & You (Healthcare e-learning) Creating More Effective ERGs & Diversity Councils Inclusion & Diversity Training for Recruiters Inclusive Recruiting & Selection™ Inclusion & Diversity Training for Multicultural & Multilingual Workplace Increasing Cultural Competencies to Drive Business Results™ Inclusion & Diversity Training for All Employees Unconscious Bias Training Can We Talk?™ series Diversity and Inclusion Means YOU!™ Cross Cultural Xpress™ Diversity Xpress™ Exploring Dimensions of Diversity Learning Modules™ All Hands On Deck Inclusion Knowledge Map™ Diversity Discussion Starters™ Special Events, Programs, Celebrations & Presentations Inclusion & Diversity Training for ERGs & Diversity Councils Creating More Effective ERGs & Diversity Councils Diversity eLearning & Blended Learning Diversity eLearning & Blended Learning diversityconference@23 No Comments October 14, 2023

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To remain competitive, companies need to embrace cultural change

To remain competitive, companies need to embrace cultural change Senior vice-president, Human Resources, RSA Canada. Over the past two decades, we’ve witnessed a radical cultural shift in workplaces across Canada. With a shrinking labour force and an increased desire for flexibility, many organizations are realizing they have to adapt and focus more on employees’ diverse needs in order to attract and retain the best talent. The very face of today’s work force is changing. There are more than 12 million millennials in Canada, and one of their primary motivations is flexibility – from where, when and how they work, to the digital and social tools they expect to utilize in the workplace. To remain competitive, companies have to commit to adjusting organizational cultures, processes and systems to accommodate the expectations of this dynamic cohort and other generations in the workplace. Embrace change at any age While some technology giants and the startup world are known for their flexible corporate culture and workplace perks, much of the corporate world has, perhaps unsurprisingly, lagged behind. I work for one of the oldest insurers in Canada, a place you might expect to be “lagging behind” in terms of a forward-thinking workplace culture. I get the preconceived notions. Flexible, agile, digitally savvy – these aren’t words you would necessarily associate with a 300-year-old legacy insurance company. But a couple of years ago, we recognized a need to change the way we operate and take a more pro-active approach to addressing factors affecting our business: from digital literacy to employee engagement. We also recognized that this evolution was not going to take the form of an overnight cultural makeover. Embracing digital innovation was essential for us to stay ahead in a competitive landscape, as well as meet our employees’ and brokers’ expectations. And a cultural disruption – refocusing our workplace culture to address our changing and diverse employees’ priorities – was crucial for attracting and retaining the best talent in Canada. So how did we do it? Catering to the next generation of leadership We began to implement this cultural shift by first identifying a number of priorities for RSA employees – specifically the increasing number of millennials within the company’s work force, and who we know will make up 75 per cent of Canada’s work force by 2024. These priorities included a flexible work environment, an increased use of digital communications tools, and the need to work in a collaborative framework in order to build a fulfilling career. Knowing this, we started thinking of ways to implement changes that would directly address our employees’ feedback and meet the needs of our diverse work force. One of the first things we realized was that only 65 per cent of the desk space at our downtown head office was being used at any given time. This insight was key to kicking off what we call the “Better Ways of Working” or “BWOW’ campaign. We consolidated our downtown head office to two floors from four, and invested the money saved into other areas of the business, including expanding our digital capabilities with significant investments in technology. We decided on an open-concept workspace, removing the barriers that separate typical corporate hierarchy – even for our C-Suite – to increase efficiency and collaboration, and introduced a variety of agile workstations so employees could choose the set-up that best suited the work they needed to do. Perhaps most importantly, we encouraged our employees and our leaders to swap “office attendance” for new behaviours; including paying attention to e-mail and meeting etiquette, and communicating via digital platforms. Our goal was to empower our employees to determine how they could best complete their work, and also reinforce that their performance would be measured on the work they produced, not the number of hours they spent at their desk. We also introduced a number of new digital communication platforms such as Skype, Yammer and WebEx, to make it easier for our employees to connect, collaborate and do business. This enabled us to keep pace with shifts and developments in technology, and also meet our employees’ and customers’ expectations for a digitally forward workplace. Lead by example Change is always scary – especially when it involves introducing new concepts and ideas to how we do business. We faced initial skepticism and push-back with some initiatives; now, almost a year into the program, we’re already seeing the signs of a high-performing talent base that’s more agile and receptive to change. Across the board, our employees have expressed that they’ve seen a significant improvement in the way they collaborate with colleagues. Most importantly, we saw first-hand how cultural changes must begin at the top: for executives and senior leadership, role modelling the behaviour they want to see is crucial. When our C-Suite and executives began to fully embrace the changes, they not only realized the benefits of the initiatives for their business outcomes – reducing meeting time and faster decision-making, to name a few – but their willingness to be innovative funnelled down to employees at every level. No matter how many years of experience a company has under its belt, or how reluctant to change it might seem, it must always continue to learn and embrace what it means to be successful. For RSA Canada, this meant changing our culture into one that fosters collaboration, and altering our work environment into one that is agile – with the ultimate goal of making life better for our brokers and customers. Executives, educators and human resources experts contribute to the ongoing Leadership Lab series. diversityconference@23 1 October 17, 2023

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Why diversity and inclusion leadership is about more than meeting numbers

Why diversity and inclusion leadership is about more than meeting numbers President & CEO, HP Canada Co. Fostering a work culture that emphasizes the importance of diversity and inclusion is a business imperative, not just a moral or ethical one. A more diverse work force will put any company into a stronger position to grow and innovate. It will attract top industry talent and help businesses connect with customers. And, of course, it’s the right thing to do. As part of one of the most diverse countries in the world, business leaders in Canada need to act now and embed diversity and inclusion practices throughout their organizations and leadership teams. How can organizations reinvent the standard for diversity and inclusion and truly lead on this front without embracing and valuing the differences – including race, ethnicity, gender, religion or sexual orientation – of their work force? As business leaders, we know that exceptional storytelling is the central underpinning of effective leadership and the way customers see your brand. All good storytellers agree you must first understand your audience. Who they are, where they come from, what experiences have shaped them and what matters to them? How do they want to be spoken to, what vernacular is comfortable, what cadence captures their attention? You can’t tell an effective story or brand narrative to your customers if you only value select points of view. This is why a commitment to diversity and inclusion leadership means more than just a number, a department or even an objective. Diversity and inclusion efforts must be embedded into the very DNA of an organization so that its brand narrative can be authentic, meaningful and distinctive. A McKinsey study shows, “Companies in the top quartile for racial and ethnic diversity are 35 per cent more likely to have financial returns above their respective national industry medians.” Another study showed that diverse companies had 2.3 times higher cash flow per employee over a three-year period than non-diverse companies did. If we don’t embrace an inclusive culture, it is impossible to speak genuinely to our customers. To lead from the top on inclusion and reinvent the standard of diversity, here are a few best practices business leaders should drive toward. Get unapologetically real. Unconscious bias is alive and well. Instead of treating it like the proverbial elephant in the room, it’s time to acknowledge that our personal experiences inform how we see the world. Recognizing the reality of unconscious bias is a critical first step in working to reduce it in the workplace. Providing diversity and inclusion training, using technology to eliminate biased language in job listings, ensuring that underrepresented colleagues have a voice and that there are opportunities at all levels of the organization are all ways to build a more inclusive, less biased work environment. Establish unimpeachable credibility. Your talk must match your walk. I’m proud to be a female leader at a company that is reinventing the standard for diversity and inclusion efforts. HP has the most diverse board of directors of any technology company in the United States, including five women among the 13 board members – almost 40 per cent. Several are from South Asia. In Canada, our leadership team is more than 60-per-cent female with diverse backgrounds across the entire team. Your commitment must shine through in everything you do. Invite and empower vocal diversity champions. Give your most passionate and active employees the resources and tools to bring diversity leadership across the entire organization at the grassroots level. Equip them to have sensitive conversations and make it safe to discuss what matters to them. Then reward and celebrate them. Give your employees meaningful benefits, such as work-life balance programs, diversity and inclusion awards, an open and collaborative workspace, employee resource groups to share like-minded experiences, goals and values. Highlight how the organization values and directs diversity efforts to drive new business, fuel innovation and attract and retain top talent. Lead by bold precedent. If you want to change how things are being done, take big, brave leaps. For instance, challenge your partners: our chief marketing officer asked each of our advertising and PR agency partners to submit a plan to increase the number of women and minorities in key creative and strategy roles. He also announced that HP would donate $100,000 to #FreeTheBid, an initiative aimed at increasing the number of female directors in advertising by pledging one in three competitive bids will go to a female director. Our global legal leadership team launched a “diversity holdback” requirement that allows HP to withhold up to 10 per cent of all amounts invoiced by our law firm partners for so long as the firm fails to maintain diverse staffing in our legal matters. Embracing diversity of ideas, perspectives and experiences has the potential to unlock innovation and growth. Business leaders must reinvent the standard of diversity and inclusion to make a difference in their organizations, marketplace and community. Executives, educators and human resources experts contribute to the ongoing Leadership Lab series. diversityconference@23 1 October 17, 2023

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Police diversity plan calls for special equity office

Police diversity plan calls for special equity office The Ottawa Police Service has released a multi-year action plan aimed at boosting diversity and stamping out discrimination within its ranks. The plan follows a 2018 census that revealed a deep internal divide over the force’s attempts recruit and promote women and minorities. Data released in November also revealed that black and Middle Eastern drivers are still being pulled over at disproportionately high rates. Later that month, Chief Peter Sloly announced a plan to address those trends would be coming in early 2020. The plan, titled “Equity, Diversity and Inclusion,” lists 10 priorities for 2020, including: Creating a diversification and equity office within the force. Reintroducing the hate crimes unit, which was announced last week. Updating outreach and recruitment criteria to remove unintended barriers for certain applicants. The Ottawa Police Service plans to update its outreach and recruitment efforts to remove ‘unintended barriers’ facing some job applicants. (Radio-Canada) A good start Michael Bach, CEO of the Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion, applauded the plan as an important first step. “I think they have done certainly all of the the right steps to move forward with this. This is deliberate action,” Bach told CBC’s All In A Day. “I always just use the analogy of a car driving up a hill. If you take your foot off the pedal you know you’re going to go backwards, so you have to keep your foot on the pedal to make sure things keep moving forward.” diversityconference@23 1 October 17, 2023

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Promoting everyday inclusion in today’s workplaces: ‘Canada’s Best Diversity Employers’ for 2020 are announced

Promoting everyday inclusion in today’s workplaces: ‘Canada’s Best Diversity Employers’ for 2020 are announced TORONTO, March 6, 2020 /CNW/ – With increased public awareness and heightened expectations by nearly all Canadians, more employers are seeing the benefits of placing diversity and inclusion at the centre of their workplace culture. That’s the message from this year’s Canada’s Best Diversity Employers, announced today by Mediacorp Canada Inc., organizers of the annual Canada’s Top 100 Employers competition. “Inclusion is a central part of conversations happening across the country,” says Kristina Leung, Senior Editor of the Canada’s Top 100 Employers project. “Organizations that make this an integral part of their workplace reap the benefits of diverse perspectives, which leads to increased innovation, productivity, and engagement.” Now in its 13th edition, the Canada’s Best Diversity Employers competition recognizes the nation’s leaders in creating inclusive workplaces for employees from five diverse groups: women; visible minorities; persons with disabilities; Aboriginal peoples; and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) peoples. The annual competition is open to any employer with its head office or principal place of business in Canada. Employers of any size may apply, whether private or public sector. “More employers are discovering that creating inclusive workplaces also serves as an important indicator to the wider community beyond the diverse communities involved,” says Richard Yerema, Managing Editor at Mediacorp. “Even small initiatives that are successful in promoting inclusion in the workplace play an important role in signaling to the wider community the values that are central to your organizational culture.” Notable diversity and inclusion initiatives at this year’s winners include: Montreal-based Business Development Bank of Canada / BDC supports female employees with their ‘Young Women at BDC’ network, offering a speaker series, networking opportunities, and social activities that inspire personal and professional growth. Toronto-based Rogers Communications Inc. maintains an Inclusion and Diversity Council, with six subcommittees to monitor progress through quarterly metrics of representation, promotion, and retention and engagement scores. Alberta Health Services organizes Indigenous Listening Days to understand the needs of their Indigenous employees, which led to the creation of an Indigenous health strategy committee. Ontario’s largest community hospital, William Osler Health System, provides training on inclusive language and inclusive gender references to ensure a respectful environment for LGBTQ employees and patients. In British Columbia, the City of Surrey adapted its recreational sports programming to support employees and residents with disabilities, such as wheelchair tennis, sledge hockey, power soccer, and wheelchair basketball. Founded in 1992, Mediacorp Canada Inc. is the nation’s largest publisher of employment periodicals. Since 1999, the Toronto-based publisher has managed the Canada’s Top 100 Employers project, which includes 18 regional and special-interest editorial competitions that reach over 15 million Canadians annually through a variety of magazine and newspaper partners. Mediacorp also operates Eluta.ca, one of Canada’s largest job search engines, which reaches millions of users annually and features editorial reviews from the Canada’s Top 100 Employers project. Mediacorp also hosts Canada’s largest conference for senior-level HR professionals, the Top Employer Summit. This year’s conference took place in November and featured a performance by Coeur de Pirate, one of the most popular musicians in the French-speaking world. The full list of Canada’s Best Diversity Employers for 2020 was announced today in a special magazine published in the The Globe and Mail. Detailed reasons for selection for each of the winners, with hundreds of stories and photos, were released by the editors today and are accessible via the competition homepage. SOURCE Mediacorp Canada Inc. For further information: Stephanie Leung, Assistant Editor, 416-964-6069 x5334 Related Links http://www.mediacorp.ca diversityconference@23 1 October 17, 2023

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How Can You Use Technology to Support a Culture of Inclusion and Diversity?

How Can You Use Technology to Support a Culture of Inclusion and Diversity? The case for diversity and inclusion in the workplace is compelling – not just because it is the right thing to do, but because numerous studies suggest it can drive better business performance too. McKinsey reinforces this in their 2018 study “Delivering through Diversity”. They document the business case for diversity highlighting the link between diversity and company financial performance, suggesting how organisations can craft better inclusion strategies for a competitive edge. With advances in technology and the growth of people analytics, HR increasingly has the tools it needs to promote and embed diversity and inclusion initiatives, and perhaps most critically prove that it can be a significant driver of business performance. Some of the most interesting and insightful research in the D&I space has been undertaken by renowned industry analyst Stacia Garr and her team at RedThread Research. I caught up with Stacia recently to learn more about the research they’ve been conducting. Despite research from the likes of McKinsey establishing a link with financial performance, much of the progress on diversity and inclusion initiatives has been painfully slow. What are the main reasons for this lack of success? In the past, many of the solutions for diversity, inclusion, and equity were focused solely on the individual. Things like unconscious bias and other diversity training efforts, mentoring, and sponsorship were all focused on the behaviour or understanding of one person. It ended up being something of a game of whack-a-mole — all built on a presumption that bias comes only from people. I think now we’re beginning to understand that bias may begin with individuals, but quickly becomes systemic — codified into our processes and cultures. And once bias is part of how we work, it is very difficult to change through one-off efforts like training. In fact, training individuals who then return to an institutionalised system of inequity sends all sorts of mixed signals — and can actually undermine even the good faith efforts companies try to make. Another ingredient that was missing in the past was a lack of energy at the top. Leaders, being largely from populations that don’t suffer from marginalisation themselves, didn’t see, or understand or prioritise D&I, which left organisations struggling to bring the diversity of the world into the workplace, and only perpetuated the lack of diversity at leadership levels. Leaders are gradually understanding the business imperative for a diverse organisation at all levels, and are beginning to realise that building an inclusive culture means also addressing bias as a systemic problem, rather than relying on individual interventions alone. diversityconference@23 1 October 17, 2023

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5 Ways Leadership Can Change the Conversation Around Diversity and Inclusion

5 Ways Leadership Can Change the Conversation Around Diversity and Inclusion One danger of having a strong company culture is that it can be far too easy to perpetuate a culture of sameness where culture “fit” is an excuse to hire people who look, think, act, and build products just like you do. The truth is, diverse organizations and teams are not only proven to perform better, but building an environment where everyone, from any background can bring their authentic self to work is simply the right thing to do. It’s crucial to approach diversity and inclusion (D&I) with humility, vulnerability, and authenticity. At CFIE, our diversity data shares a snapshot of the composition of our company by gender, ethnicity, and age along with our plans for the future to make the organization more diverse and inclusive as we grow. If we don’t embrace an inclusive culture, it is impossible to speak genuinely to our customers. To lead from the top on inclusion and reinvent the standard of diversity, here are a few best practices business leaders should drive toward. Lorem Ipsum dolor sit amet quid dolormen gravida nibh vel velit auctor aliqunean sollicitudinlorem quis bibendum auci elit consequat When transparency is a core commitment, it’s important that you’re not just sharing what the organization is excelling at, but the harder realities as well. Not only did we find that more and more candidates and employees were asking that we share our work in this space publicly, but we found that when we did, engagement increased. By being transparent and sharing the sometimes harsh realities, our work in diversity and inclusion becomes more inclusive by welcoming input from all. In order to build a company of generations to come, diversity and inclusion must be bought in by senior leaders as a business priority. Like with any challenge, leaders must dive in and analyze from a business perspective rather than sit on the sidelines hoping the challenge will sort itself out. What will they find? That the topic is hard, messy, and personal, but imperative, for the success of your business, your brand, and your customers. diversityconference@23 1 October 17, 2023

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The Best Motivational Speakers

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